T-Acadie

 

Pam Weeks

is a talented multi-instrumentalist as well as a tunesmith and teacher. In T-Acadie, Pam focuses on Cajun, Old Time, and Quebecois fiddle, and mountain dulcimer in an amazing flat-picking style all her own, but occasionally plays piano, mandolin, guitar, viola, cello, Celtic harp, flute, or saxophone. She is well known as a contradance and Cajun dance band fiddler and also as a solo mountain dulcimer performer. Her solid, rhythmic fiddle and dulcimer playing, often trading off harmony and melody with Jim, is the backbone of the T-Acadie sound. Pam teaches instrumental music and voice at her studios in Turner and Bath as well as at her home in Bowdoin, ME., which she shares with a Border Collie named "Sadie" who often tours with the band, 2 cats, and several chickens. Check out Pam’s web page at www.pamweeks.com

Jim Joseph

is another multi-instrumentalist. In T-Acadie he plays primarily button accordion and 5-string banjo, but you will see the percussionist side of Jim on “les pieds”(feet) during French Canadian tunes, and spoons, dumbek, snare drum, jaw harp, fiddlesticks just about any time. Jim played mandolin in the Maine Howitzers mandolin orchestra back in the ‘80’s and started out on 5-string banjo playing bluegrass in the 3-finger style. He quickly changed to clawhammer style when he started playing with Scrod Pudding to accompany a clogging group. Jim started playing button accordion in 1994 and became proficient very quickly (he now owns 5 accordions!) He plays straight New England style and Quebecois for contradances, family dances and concerts and, of course, Cajun style for Cajun dances. In T-Acadie, Jim sings too, and does a GREAT Limberjack demonstration! 

Bill Olson

is probably best known at home and abroad as a contradance caller and choreographer. His dance compositions are known for their high “potential” energy and excellent “flow”, and are called by contradance callers all over the world. Bill has called for contradances and at dance weekends and festivals throughout the United States, including the “Vernal’s Equinox” dance weekend in Florida, and the Buffalo Gap, “American Buffalo Dance Weekend” in Capon Bridge, West Virginia. Bill also plays upright bass and guitar and a little bit of fiddle. In T-Acadie, Bill plays guitar or bass, sings and calls. Bill started dancing in 1976, calling in 1985, playing guitar in 1958, and bass in 1993. He has been singing all his life. When he moved to Maine in 1984 he started playing in a band that occasionally did some contradances. One time the caller didn’t show up, sooooo… “Hey, I can do THAT!”…